Dragon Whiskers Chips

Dragon Whiskers vegetable is the vine of chouchou/ chuchu/ sayote/ chayote. One can only find some sayote or choko leaves recipes while googling but searching ‘choko chips’ you’ll end up with chocolate chips. All of us accustomed to, as it’s called in China, Long xu cai, are familiar with the stir fry or soup-broth – bouyon bred, in Mauritian Creole. I’m no longer a fan of bouyon so when I’m left with a handful, I tried to make chips.

I suggested this on facebook as we can’t kale was not yet available here, but didn’t try it until recently, when I no longer have an oven. I pan-fried them and they may be better in the oven or dehydrator (or they may be too fine who knows). What I do most often is drizzle oil in a thick-based lidded pot that I would later use for cooking 1/4 pot of something else, add the leaves even if they overlap. When they look crispy, sprinkle with salt and scoop out. My pot is then ready for the next dish.

Use some recipe for kale chips, these are less coarse and their surface spreads evenly in a pan and they don’t stick. I love their taste plain salted but if you don’t quite want them plain, they’d go best with a pinch of garlic and chilli or mustard powder? Dr Greger suggested using mustard with greens that you don’t leave to stand after chopping, we’re finally learning the science behind traditional cooking. These don’t need chopping. I’d suggest using them quite fresh (in my old fridge that frosts, takes about 2 days til it withers) or pan-fried they end up being stir-fry consistency. I don’t like the stalks and I’m yet to try the curls, the actual dragon whiskers I suppose. No one I know eats that part.

How about some tropical plant fish with those chips?

Traditionally used spices with greens cooked otherwise are garlic or onion or simply a dried chili or a few mustard seeds.

Nutritional value and bonus home remedies: The plant is a rich source of amino acid and vitamin C. It is diuretic and has anti-inflammatory properties. The leaf is used for treatment of arteriosclerosis and hypertension and kidney stones. According to Stuartxchange, the fruit is laxative, raw pulp is used for soothing of skin rashes and roasted leaves might help in suppuration of boils.

Yeah, that remedy for boils is the closest thing I found to the chips! Must be a tasty remedy.

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