It’s not easy being young, black, and vegan

“Many people look at me skeptically when I tell them I’m living a plant-based lifestyle. I’ve noticed that white vegans in particular often respond with something like, “Oh wow that’s so great, I’m really proud of you.” As if I’m doing something remarkable. But according to the same Vegetarian Research Group study mentioned above, only 3% of American whites identify as vegetarian or vegan, compared to 6% of blacks. Doesn’t twice the number of black people living on plant-based diets mean that I should be the one who’s surprised and proud of you?”

Call for Presentations – Asian Voices Challenging Racism, Colonialism, and Speciesism Online Conference

Call for Presentations – East and South Asian Voices Challenging Racism, Colonialism, and Speciesism Online Conference (See event page in link, Hosted by Institute for Critical Animal Studies, North America, Deadline for abstracts March 1st)

March 28, 2015
Online Free Conference
All are invited and welcome to attend
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SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

With the animal advocacy movement is growing more intersectional and international, this conference strives to provide space for a growing marginalized community within the movement. This conference wants to provide space for East and South Asian ethnic background. We require that all presenters have an East or South Asian ethnic background. We are requesting all presentations promote, critical, radical, intersectional, grass-roots, and liberatory politics and promote veganism, social justice, and animal liberation.

Each presentation will be pre-recorded by the presenter via Youtube and submitted to: Hana Low
hana.low@gmail.com

Each presentation should be 20 to 25 minutes long.

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Please submit Abstract by March 1:

Video presentations due March 10:

1. Title

2. Biography third person one paragraph 80 to 100 words.

3. Abstract one paragraph 200 to 220 words.

To: Hana Low
hana.low@gmail.com / skype: hanalow

Papers will not be due until we lock in a book contract.

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SCHEDULE

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Presentation One

Link to Presentation:

Title
Hana Low

Abstract

Biography

__________

Presentation One – Question and Answer
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Presentation Two

Link to Presentation:

Title
Wayne Hsiung

Abstract

Biography

__________

Presentation Two – Question and Answer
__________

Presentation Three

Link to Presentation:

Title
Priya Sawhney

Abstract

Biography
__________

Presentation Three – Question and Answer
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Presentation Four

Link to Presentation:

Title
Penelope Low

Abstract

Biography
__________

Presentation Four – Question and Answer
__________

They seem to still be looking for Presentation Five, 6 and 7.

Images depicting evolution from a monkey to a man with a traditional Chinese long braid and I’m unsure about row 2 where a crouched man with a long braid or tail turns into a bear and into a pig.

Laundry tips

Countries with no dryers

Here only hotels and I guess 1% have dryers. The rest of us use air. I don’t know if I’m wrecking my washing machine using Dr Bronner’s 18-in-1 pure castille soap but it’s all I could find and hey it’s safe for black clothes. I’ll never shop again + a friend doesn’t make clothes anymore so I’d rather my clothes would last. I don’t care about looks but my lycra started coming apart, maybe it’s the new machine or me. I’ve never used delicate setting, I sticked things in a pillowcase. Now I handwash lycra. The rest is fine the clothes don’t come out as when I used shikakai/soapnut alone or kind laundry detergent or even germ-buster (I thought it’s concentrated and more economical, never tried their laundry detergent). Without the latter 3 products, I feel the need for softening so as not to iron. Before I’d simply take off the line and hang in closet or fold and clothes don’t seem creased. I used baking soda only on whites but sheets (also ended up with a stain using soda alone in the machine, I might try lemon oil on that). Baking soda can be used as softener.

For extra soft clothing, add 1/2 cup vinegar (a natural fabric softener) to your washer with each load. Don’t worry, your clothes will not smell like vinegar once dry.

It defo won’t, I’ve pre-soaked in pure vinegar or used more than one cup for mold removal. No smell remained. I use essential oils to kill germs and try repel insects when it’s hanging, I doubt it smells of any once it’s dry. I wonder if softening shortens drying time? Mine seems longer compared to neighbours but overnight and a day suffices in Curepipe.

My old bedsheets smell similar to the time they were washed with Savon National, my grandma’s house didn’t have a stench like most modern houses do (scents from detergents), a kitchen smell lingered in the adjacent bedrooms, mixed with the smell of firewood and coconut oil. Be it sunlight and air and the cotton, I don’t know, but that’s what the bedsheets she embroidered still smell like. I take comfort in it. I’m allergic to softeners nowadays and to detergents too. I was forced to get standard laundry services overseas, even the animal-tested laundry detergents on their own are so toxic. I like to breathe when I sleep.

laundry on a line

Tip for no ironing: Hang stuff as pictured above, except hang t-shirts by the shoulders (or open shirts by collar fold) when very damp then flip if needed to avoid the line and pegs’ marks on the base.

Rest of the world

“I have had great success with removing static cling by putting a washcloth with a safety pin on each corner into the dryer with each load. I have used this for years and am still using the same washcloth and the same safety pins that I first started with. Give it a try. You will be amazed at your success with this tactic for eliminating static cling. I also put a few drops of lemon oil on the cloth for a fresh scent.” – Patti

Another commenter says the same. I didn’t even know there were ways to remove static, never seen anyone doing it at the laundromat overseas.

“Thugs, skets, and thots” There is no ONE black story

Media Diversified

by Shane Thomas 

Around this time last year, a large part of the discussion around the cinema award season focused on 12 Years A Slave, and its possible chances on winning prizes at the Academy Awards.

While there are myriad problems with the Oscars, the reason why it matters is because it remains the closest thing the West has as a seal of film excellence. It’s a flawed system – and may have a limited shelf life – but right now, it’s the best we’ve got.

An Academy Award isn’t just a gold statue. It often helps to propel movies, and their specific subject matters into the wider social consciousness – especially if they’re not part of the summer blockbuster season. For much of last year, Steve McQueen was asked about the wider issue of slavery almost as much as he was asked about making 12 Years A…

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